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Thread: Robert Traver, Herbert Hoover, et al.

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    North Georgia
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    Default Robert Traver, Herbert Hoover, et al.

    The other day, I visited my local fly shop looking for a brown dry fly neck. I was astounded to find no dry fly hackle
    there. I was told that there was so little interest in dry fly fishing they stopped stocking them. the only hackle they had were large ones for streamers etc . I was floored! Has our sport changed that much? Have we lost the ( My Opinion) spirit of fly fishing? Competitive fishing? Are we missing something here? Have we lost the wisdom of Robert Traver ( Testament of a Fisherman), and Herbert Hoover (Fishing for Fun and to Wash your Soul.) If you have not read these, I highly recommend them.
    I do not mean to criticize anyone There is room for all. Just sounding off! Pat

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Ashburn, Virginia
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    I’ll use nymphs on tailwaters in April when the water’s too cold for dry fly activity but after that it’s all on top for me. Plenty of dead chicken parts in the shops in Montana.

    Regards,
    Scott
    Just a tourist passing through


    SBS Index updated 2/21/18

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    Mid-Missouri, USA
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    I am primarily a dry-fly fisherman. If absolutely nothing is working, I will occasionally go to the dark side and tie on a nymph.

    steve

  4. #4
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    Pat,

    I suspect you are looking at a very narrow and I mean very narrow regional situation. That particular 'fly shop' has customers who only fish flies of have a need for feathers of a particular type, obviously not dry fly. Expand outward and I hope you find a shop that carries some decent necks. All is not lost, as the spirit of fly fishing, be it dry or wet, still lives on and in many areas is getting even bigger and more popular.

    Larry ---sagefisher---

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    North Georgia
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    Thanks for your comments, Larry. Hope you are right.

  6. #6
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    Dec 2003
    Location
    Shallotte, NC - USA
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    Admittedly, I catch mo re fish going wet then dry - But that's not to say I'm exclusively wet! But I've never heard of such a statement as a lack of interest in dry flying material. I just recently er-stocked on some tying materials, and here's from where .....

    https://www.jsflyfishing.com/index.p...dry+fly+hackle

  7. #7

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    I also think that the art of dry fly fishing is slowing down. I worked in a shop for about two years, we carried Collins necks, though we sold some we didn't sell the quantity compared to synthetics and other material. I do tying shows and when I look at what other tyers are tying there are very few tying dry flies.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    Nunica Mi U S A
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    I think some people have the misconception that dry flies are harder to tie than wets and nymphs. I got this impression from participating in and hosting fly swaps. They will naturally not invest a lot of money into dry fly hackle but leave those flies to the pros in Thailand.
    Guns don't kill children. Children do! Guns just make them so much more efficient.

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