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Thread: Ok..What am I doing wrong..

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    Boulder, CO USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by billknepp View Post
    Rod was dragontail Hellbender 13-11' zoom rod.. really nice rod!
    Line was 15 ft of tusa 4.5 Orange level
    5'of 5x mono
    Sz14 hares ear and sz12 kebari only weight on the grhe was the gold rib of brass beading wire..
    Which is why it's gotta be me.. this rod is rated a 7:4 and should not have probs delivering unless the off factor is me...
    Sounds like a perfect setup.

    I shouldn't speculate on your cast, as that rod is quite different from anything that I've cast.
    Last edited by Bruce Norikane; 01-26-2016 at 12:08 AM.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by billknepp View Post
    Rod was dragontail Hellbender 13-11' zoom rod.. really nice rod!
    Line was 15 ft of tusa 4.5 Orange level
    5'of 5x mono
    Sz14 hares ear and sz12 kebari ...
    I am not familiar with the Dragontail Hellbender rod other than to know it exist.
    15 ft ( 4.5 meters) of No. 4.5 line is a heavy line, and I would think it would be easier to cast than say a No. 3 line of the same length
    .
    5 ft (1.5m) of 5x tippet might not roll out and fully extend with to low a line speed. But from your description it's not your tippet that is piling up , it's the entire line. I think it must be a timing problem. Or a problem with the speed you are moving the rod.

    I would recommend you start with the line laying straight out in front of you on the ground. Starting your back cast from there may help to load the rod for the back cast. So that the rod will flex properly to add power to the forward cast. To keep the fly hook from catching on the grass I would just replace it with a short piece of bright color yarn, not to long so it won't have any more wind resistance than a fly.

    It has been stated that the power for the forward cast comes from the back cast. It is important to to think about wanting the line during the back cast to go up at about 45 degrees, not straight back. Then on the forward cast the line is thrown forward and downward at 45 degrees. At least that is how I think about it.

    This 4 minute video from Daiwa might be helpful. The naration is in Japanese, but the video is of pretty good quality, you can see the line fairly well. And the graphics put on top of the video shows the casting angle of the rod you should be aiming to duplicate. It is a video showing how to get started Tenkara fishing. So the first 2 mintues just point out you need Rod, Line, Tippet aka Leader and a fly. In Japanese called a Kebari.
    The casting instruction is only the last 2 minutes of the video.

    The man in the video is Katayama Etsuji ( 片山悦司さん) He is a Field Tester for Daiwa, and it is my understanding that he develops the Level Line Tenkara rods for Daiwa. The Tenkara set up he recommends is shown in the first half of the video. He recommends a 3 to 4 meter rod. A level line length of Rod Lenth + 1.5 meters of No. 3 line, + about 1.8 meters of tippet. That tippet length is a little long for my taste, but that is about the same length you are using. The major difference is he is recommending a level line 1 meter longer than you are using. Oh, and you can ignore the 6 - 11 inch Yellow marker line he put on between the end of the level line and the tippet.

    Now he grips the rod at the top of the grip, but that is his style. Some people prefer it. Others prefer to hold the grip in the middle or at the butt end of the grip. Try it or just hold the rod the way you prefer.

    The important thing is to observe the angle of his cast. Where he stops the rod on the back cast and the forward cast. If you watch closely you can see the slight pause at the end of the back cast before starting the forward cast. You might even notice how the line tugs on the rod while the rod is held vertically before he starts the forward cast. The is the line loading the rod.

    And also observe the rod angles to avoid. Not to far back, not to far forward. Stop about straight up at 12:00 for the back cast. Stop at about 2:30 on the forward cast.

    The naration is in Japanese. But as they say a picture is worth a thousand words. Then a moving picture is worth a million words. Try to notice the total time of the cast. The pause. And the speed he moves the rod.

    http://www.daiwaweb.com/jp/fishing/f...ml#Keiryu#none

    The above video and one other one - showing him fishing. Can be opened by clicking on the text box on the below webpage. The above video it the top box. The fishing video is the bottom box.

    http://daiwa.globeride.jp/column/tenkara/index.html

    Of course each rod or rod + line has it's own way it likes to be cast as a system. Your Hellbender rod may require a bit different timing from the Daiwa rod and line his is using. But the basics will be the same. You will just have to play around with the speed of rod movement, the length of the pause, etc to find what works with your rod and line.

    Good luck.

    D

  3. #13

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    Bill,
    I think I can help, because I had the same problem when I first started. Two points: First, I would begin with a furled line since they are easier to cast for most people. Secondly--and this is the more important point--keep your casting stroke short--really just a "flick," with the rod ending high. Usually, coils at your feet mean that you are over-powering the cast and stopping too low. You say to yourself, "I have to get that line out there!" and you do the exact opposite of what you need to do. Think "gentle flick" (for a good-quality rod), stop higher than you think you should, and you'll be amazed at what happens. Good luck and hope this helps!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
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    Hey thanks for the reply.. I picked out 4 moonlit furled lines n plan on implementing them n getting things right.. and I keep watching vids of casters n what your saying really runs true..I'm seeing pretty much what your talking of with every caster I watch..n it is merely a flick of their wrist..I was using way to much western influence on my attempts.. working on locating good water in my area.n that's proving a task at the moment..since moving to cny more yrs ago then I care to admit I'm finding the fishing waters are way more spread out and access very limited.. that and so much is"closed" till April... really has my opportunities limited at the moment..second half of April should be awesome though I'm hoping..
    Last edited by billknepp; 03-10-2016 at 06:38 AM.
    Wish ya great fishing,Bill

  5. #15

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    If you have an old 3 or 4wt fly line around, there is another option you can try.

  6. #16
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    Dec 2006
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    I have not seen or cast the Hellbender, but I think they advertise it as being their big fish rod, so it is probably pretty stiff. Size 4.5 level line is plenty heavy so it should work, though. Switching to a furled line will not improve your form. It will allow you to cast with bad form so you might never improve, though.

    I have a good friend who is a tenkara angler and also a western fly fishing casting instructor. Although most tenkara anglers use much more wrist, it you have a good western cast you don't have to change much at all (at least if you follow the Joan Wulff school of casting rather than the Lefty Kreh school of casting!). The one thing you absolutely must change, though, is the followthough. Do not, Do Not dip your rod tip at the end of the forward cast. Keep it high - no lower than 45 degrees. The basic physics of casting a line, whether western or tenkara, are identical. You must smoothly accelerate on the back cast and stop the back cast abruptly with the rod just past vertical. Pause until the line straightens behind you. You should be able to feel it tug on the rod when it does, but watch the back cast in case you haven't yet noticed the tug. As soon as the line straightens, start your forward cast. You must accelerate throughout the forward cast and you absolutely must stop the forward cast abruptly, with the rod no lower than 45 degrees. Almost everyone who has tenkara casting problems is doing two things wrong. 1) the don't stop abruptly enough. 2) they don't stop the forward cast with the rod high enough.

    The cast should not be just wrist. You should move your upper arm, forearm and wrist. Review Joan Wulff's on-line videos of a fly cast. Her comments about the wrist snap that ends a forward cast - like using a screen door - push with your thumb (most tenkara anglers grip the rod with the index finger on top rather than the thumb, so push with your index finger) and pull with your ring finger and pinky) are THE key to a tenkara cast. That will give the rod the loading it needs so the rod tip whips forward when you stop your cast ABRUPTLY. I suggest Joan Wulff's videos rather than video's of Sakakibara because she describes what she is doing. He doesn't speak English so he can't tell you step by step what he does. But remember, do not dip the rod at the end of the forward cast. That is the one big difference.

    I would slightly disagree with David and suggest starting with a line (not counting tippet) that is no longer than the rod. Once you get it to roll over properly, then go to a longer line.
    Tenkara Bum

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by CM_Stewart View Post
    ..... Although most tenkara anglers use much more wrist, it you have a good western cast you don't have to change much at all (at least if you follow the Joan Wulff school of casting rather than the Lefty Kreh school of casting!). The one thing you absolutely must change, though, is the followthough. Do not, Do Not dip your rod tip at the end of the forward cast. .... You must smoothly accelerate on the back cast and stop the back cast abruptly with the rod just past vertical. Pause until the line straightens behind you. You should be able to feel it tug on the rod when it does, but watch the back cast in case you haven't yet noticed the tug. As soon as the line straightens, start your forward cast. ....
    The cast should not be just wrist. You should move your upper arm, forearm and wrist. Review Joan Wulff's on-line videos of a fly cast. Her comments about the wrist snap that ends a forward cast - like using a screen door - push with your thumb (most tenkara anglers grip the rod with the index finger on top rather than the thumb, so push with your index finger) and pull with your ring finger and pinky) are THE key to a tenkara cast. .....
    I would agree with Chris that Joan's description of how to cast is very much in line with what I think I know about Tenkara casting. And her style of casting is more Tenkara-like that other western casting instruction I have seen.

    I really like her description of an imaginary line between your eye and the target point, and to make the power snap when the rod is perpendicular to that line. Or stated another way, make sure the fastest part of your forward cast is after your rod reaches that perpendicular point. I think you can also think of making the fastest part of your back cast after the rod reaches that perpendicular point too.

    Joan Wulff Teaches the Basics of Fly Casting

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KyThAv-WPSg



    It's not in this video, but I think it was in another video using a lot of the same video where Joan emphasizes the importance of keeping a little space between the palm and the rod grip. That is hold the rod grip lightly. Don't hold it tightly like driving a nail with a hammer. I think that does two things: it improves the cast, and it helps the rod tip osciallation to dampen out faster at the end of the forward cast.

    I think the important result of learning to improve your casting technique is not to just be able to cast, but with better casting technique you will be able to cast a lighter line well, which will allow you to fish and hold more of the line off the water than is possible when fishing with a heavier line. And help you to better cast in wind because you have learned how to transfer more power into the line from the rod motion.

    As for the thumb on top used with western rods. Actually if you look at a lot of Japanese tenkara fishing videos some people do cast with with the thumb on top, mostly the older generation. I do think it is a more natural hand arm alignment, and I cast with that grip from time to time. I find it a useful way to use a different set of muscles during the cast. Particularly useful during a long afternoon of fishing especially when fishing with a long rod, 3.9m or longer, and a long line. Not so much useful when fishing with a rod of 3.6m or shorter with a short light line. Worth trying from time to time.

    D

  8. #18
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    Oct 2002
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    Awesome video. Joan Wulff is a great casting instructor.

    While fishing in a strong wind last week, I noticed my form was falling apart when I tried to power my casts into the wind. A slightly relaxed stroke worked much better.

    Thanks
    Last edited by Bruce Norikane; 03-16-2016 at 02:56 AM.

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