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Thread: Why Snake Type Guides

  1. #1

    Default Why Snake Type Guides

    While setting up our flyrods today my friend ask.....
    "Why does this flyrod have guides like a spinning rod?" (single foot guides)
    "And my other rod has these swirley type guides" (snake guides)

    I had no answer... Usually a flyrod has one or two stripping guides and then the rest are the single wire snake guides. Can anyone shed some light on this?
    Aloha,
    Stan

  2. #2
    Normand Guest

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    i dont think its a weight thing---

    untwist this


    and you get this

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Default

    I'm going to go out on a limb and suggest that snake guides produce less friction because of their design. At least, that's what the shape suggests to me.

  4. #4

    Default

    There will be a slight weight saving because of fewer wraps and epoxy and there will be a very slight stiffening of the action because of the longer lengths of the snakes.
    Will this be discernible when casting or fishing? Probably not.

  5. #5
    Cold Guest

    Default

    I have no idea either...however, I will add that ALL of my rods with single foot guides have outfished ALL of my rods with snakes.

    Coincidence? Probably.

    ...

    ...but that didn't stop me from looking for a new 7wt that featured single-foot guides.

    ...which has also proven itself a fish-catching machine.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackster View Post
    There will be a slight weight saving because of fewer wraps and epoxy and there will be a very slight stiffening of the action because of the longer lengths of the snakes.
    Will this be discernible when casting or fishing? Probably not.
    Try "definately not".!!!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold View Post
    I have no idea either...however, I will add that ALL of my rods with single foot guides have outfished ALL of my rods with snakes.

    Coincidence? Probably.
    ...
    How can a person make such a statement?? "OUT FISHED"..?? No way to PROVE positive or negative. Had you stated that it normally is able to cast further..?? Or because of its cosmetics you prefer using it than the rod with snakes..??...but OUT FISHED????

  8. #8
    Normand Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Clough View Post
    I'm going to go out on a limb and suggest that snake guides produce less friction because of their design. At least, that's what the shape suggests to me.
    i think either one provides the same amount of friction. there's only a single point of contact between the fly line and either guide

  9. #9
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Clough View Post
    I'm going to go out on a limb and suggest that snake guides produce less friction because of their design. At least, that's what the shape suggests to me.
    SNAKE guides ( NOT single footed wire guides) were made in the beginning ( way back when people even had to walk to work..let alone ride a horse) because they were the easiest to MAKE

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Normand View Post
    i think either one provides the same amount of friction. there's only a single point of contact between the fly line and either guide

    Correcto! There cannot be anymore than the tangent point of the line itself running across the face of the "guide" ( regardless of style) for a short distance generating a "line of contact" ( and its mighty small)

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